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are talking about? we talked already about religion and taxes. let's talk about foreign policy. so, what did the founders that you talk about in the book have to say about america's role in the world? >> guest: i think that again this is a matter of great dispute. there was one major foreign policy issue than the discussion and that was the war between france and england and what they were going to do about it, and even then you had to very distinctive physicians. hamilton was pro-british and jefferson was pro french. and this is what led to huge split between those and this is how part of the federalist and the republicans were put with all sorts of other things i think that the hamiltonian position that washington accepted was america ought to be neutral had no navy didn't have any viet the time, had a strong interest in trade with both india and france with just basic body of delhi and self-interest that should remain neutral. neutrality favored the british because there is no american support for the british but a lot of americans wanted to go out and be privateers for france because the
already about religion in taxes than foreign policy. what did the founders he talked about in your vocab to say about america's role in the world? >> guest: i think again this is a matter of great dispute. there was one major foreign policy issue in the washington administration that was the war between france and england and what they were going to do about it. even then you had two very distinctive positions. hamilton was roughly pro-british. jefferson was pro-french and this really is what led to the huge split between those two men. the national bank issue was controversial, but this is how the federalists and republicans aligned with whether they were going to favor britain or france out or could eventually produce all sorts of other things. i think the hamiltonian edition, which washington accepted as america ought to be mutual because it had no army, no navy. he didn't have money at the time. it had a strong interest in trade with england in france and just basic machiavelli and self-interest that america should remain mutual. neutrality favored the british because there is no ame
about our foreign policy, not just republicans -- that not just republicans bought into. hillary still buys into it to some degree. we need to me with all leaders. i am not afraid of losing a propaganda battle because i am meeting with hugo chavez. former cannot to me with these leaders sends a signal that we're arrogant and we're doing things on our own and that will not repair the damage that has been done to our foreign policy as a consequence of george bush and that will make it difficult to mobilize the international support, whether to get iran to stand down on a clear weapons or deal with the situation in darfur. if you look at the opposition to the war, i did not just stumble into it. i laid out what i thought would happen and i want voters to understand we will have another set of difficult decisions on iraq or north korea or anything out there we do not know yet. they need to ask themselves, shouldn't it be relevant who got the most important foreign- policy issue right and who got a wrong and how that will bear out their decision to vote. tavis: barack obama will be sworn in
blunders on foreign policy issues. the most recent one is a failure for america to retaliate in some meaningful or symbolic way on the death of an american ambassador in benghazi. the. >> the george bush administration would have piled in there, blown things to pieces and exacted terrible retribution. that's the american way for a long time. is that the right way? would that created, however awful the incident of a death involving a death of an ambassador is, is it right that president obama says let's get this in con tex, let's not attack. wars are extremely costly, both financially and with the human loss of life. >> you just went from 0 to 60. what i'm saying is in 2000, 1999-2000. after 9/11, one of the things we learned from osama bin laden, the jihad dis and jaul kwr strongly emboldened when there was no response to the bombing of the u.s.s. cole. there was no response that demonstrated you can not do this to americans. >> what would you have done in benghazi in the aftermath. >> i'm not a general -- >> hang on. you said i went from naught to 60, what's the middle ground betwee
to ready about religion and taxes. talk a little bit about foreign-policy. what did the founders that you talk about in your book have to say about america's role in the world? >> guest: i think again, this was a matter of great dispute. there was major foreign-policy issue in the washington administration and that was a war between france and england and what they were going to do about it. and even then, you had two very distinctive positions. hamilton was roughly pro-british and jefferson was roughly pro-french and this is what really led to the huge split between those two men. the national bank issue is controversial, but this was how the party the federalist and republicans alliance was whether they would favor britain nor france in that war that would eventually produce all sorts of other things. i think that the hamiltonian decision which washington accepted was that america ought to be neutral because it had no army, it had no navy. it didn't have money at the time. it had a strong interest in trade with both england and france, and just they seek machiavellian self-interest that
. today, the focus on foreign policy. and speaking of foreign policy, one of the first american women to fly combat missions in iraq, defeated a tea party incumbent. she's now a member of congress. we're going to meet her. tammy duckworth joins us for our meet the new members series. you're watching "the daily rundown," only onsomeness. that. except it's 2% every year. does that make a difference? search "cost of financial advisors" ouch. over time it really adds up. then go to e-trade and find out how much our advice costs. spoiler alert: it's low. really? yes, really. e-trade offers investment advice and guidance from dedicated, professional financial consultants. it's guidance on your terms, not ours. that's how our system works. e-trade. less for us. more for you. [ male announcer ] why do more emergency workers everywhere trust duracell...?? duralock power preserve. locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. now...guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. >>> president obama will start his second term focused on the debt and the sequester and spending and all of
are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyway we are pleased to have this occasion and have a discussion about the subjects that are in the book for foreign policy. [applause] >> thank you steve. you instrumental to make this project have been. also oxford university press that published the book and also to my:editor catherine and the people here at the foundation also jonathan who helped to make the book possible. the reason it was necessary storming off the stage from 1970's of the insurgent movement is important yet at the same time that is less well understood. and we had the great bull of on the taliban but we wanted to focus how did they develop after 9/11? we have one dozen chapters in the book and those on stage you contributed in those two writing a book that chapter with the taliban insurgency as it relates to the condo tarry taliban without movement to negotiate with the afghan government were not followed up. also the professor at national defence university and at columbia and that a high ranking pakistan a police official that now has the political scene when
towards foreign policy. and he's got a long list of foreign policy challenges in the second term. iranian nukes, how to deal with china. you know, a big sort of macro agenda in the obama administration has been to reduce our footprint in the middle east, become less entangled in that part of world and pivot towards engaging with east asia. and there's been a lot of work in the first term that has strengthened ties between the u.s. and many east asia countries. and obama officials talk about that as a big project of the second term. >> well, that is the perfect segue to my next guest. christiane amanpour, i don't think there's anyone better to talk about that. thank you all very much. reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, stayin
and taxes. let's talk about foreign policy. what did the founders you talk about inner book have to say about america's role in the world? >> guest: i think that, again, this was matter of great dispute. there was one major foreign policy issue in the washington administration and that was the war between france and england and what they were going to do about it. and even then you had two very distinctive positions. hamilton was roughly pro british, jefferson was ruthly from french, and this led to a huge split between the two men. the national bank issue was controversial but this is how the parties, the federalists and the republicans aligned, whether they were going to favor britain or france in that war that would eventually produce napoleon... to allow americans to account said american ships and let them participate in some ways in the left-handed jefferson did this because he thought we went to france for their help and resolution and the french were fighting for democracy and what really evolves them are two positions, a realistic position of america's interests, this is what w
foreign policy by the way it has been the operating principle, of american foreign policy in decades past attack against any american citizen is attack against the country and will not be tolerated and will be responded to swiftly and certainty. overwhelming show of force. again, details on this are hurricanemurky, as you suggeste. but it's disspiritting to see them stand by and allow the special forces go in and botch the job. again, there is much we don't know a perhaps there were american forces on the scene. from what we know now we didn't respond and they did. that is not a good thing. >> the british have complained and the japanese that the operation went on so quickly they weren't even informed let alone asked to give any assistance. >> bret: speaking of assistance, now we know that the u.s. is going to provide air lift to the french in to mali. they are going to move troops, french troops to mali. we don't know when are how many but it seems like the u.s. assistance is increasing. >> the assistance is increasing. it raises questions about syria and when and how we choose to interv
office his foreign policy views. this morning, someone who supports the hagel nomination, the former secretary of state, general colin powell, here to speak exclusively to us. general powell, good morning, welcome back to the program. >> good morning, david. welcome to be here. >> i want to start on chuck hagel. why do you think he should be confirmed? >> i think there are a number of reasons. first, i think he has had a very, very distinguished public service record that he can stand on. there are a lot of comments about different things he said over the years and i think he will have a chance to respond to all those comments as the confirmation hearings. but it might be useful just to stand back and take a look at this man overall a young man who volunteered to go to vietnam. they wanted to send him to europe, a nice, safe, place, he wanted to go to vietnam. he and his brother went. they were both wounded, he was wounded twice. came back to vietnam, went to school on the gi bill, veterans administration. from there went to other things in life. he supported president reagan in his
for an emperor of other issues that will be discussed about the administration approach to foreign policy. this nomination will carry the weight or burden that other issues will not carry because of issues around his nomination. not justice, but the administration's position -- not just his, but the administration's position on iran and other issues. >> colby is exactly right, and that is why hearings are important. we are focused on whether they get a yes or no, but foreign policy is in area where obama is independent of the congress. he has a free hand, so you get a national discussion on those events. this is a good time, particularly since hagel is, as the "washington post" editorial- page, which is not exactly right wing, said, "hagel is a republican in name only." on these issues he is to the left not only of republicans, but obama. it is not a centrist appointment. it will allow the senate and republicans to have an open debate, which we ought to have, on where republican wants to go on and a second term, on iran, israel, and defense spending and a particular. >> next, the looming
in moving people to see some of the backroom dealings of u.s. foreign policy. it has exposed people to think harder. i do think it played a role in leading people in tunisia and egypt to look at some of the cables and see what people already knew in their gut the soccer field in wikileaks about the alliances between u.s. foreign policy with the most repressive elements in those countries. let's hope that changes as the uprisings continue. anytime you can learn more about what is being done in our name, it is critical. that is part of what transparency is about. the freedom of information act is still not working well under the obama administration. some of that is pos/t 9/11. in los war will lead to a decline in information transparency access. anytime you can have less sequence -- secrecy, that is good. less secrecy is needed. it was handled at the outset by partnering with newspapers like "the guardian," traditional newspapers of distinction. wikileaks released documents around the world to newspapers in india, haiti, the middle east, latin america. it has had an impact in countries we do
of mali, bamako. when we come back, we will be talking about vietnam, the heads of the foreign-policy establishment that had been nominated by president obama, chuck hagel to head defense and john kerry to become secretary of state, both fought in vietnam. we will look at vietnam and talk to the author of an explosive new book. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with aaron matÉ. >> we are less than a week away from president obama second term inauguration. to the leading figures nominated dead the foreign policy establishment have their political roots in the vietnam war. chuck hagel, tapped by president obama to the secretary of defense, is a former army sergeant. if confirmed, will become the first vietnam war veteran to head the pentagon. obama's secretary of state nominee, john kerry, became one of the most prominent veterans to oppose the vietnam war after his return. testifying before the senate in 1971. he discussed the atrocities under it in winter soldier investigation, where over 150 veter
christian conservatives, foreign-policy conservatives, and we pretty much get along on everything. i don't think there's very many things we disagree on. we discussed every issue that comes along every week we have two meetings a year african heads of 100 conservative organization. i can say they are as enthusiastic as either. the movement continues to grow. there's always new young writers coming along. authors periodicals and things that are vibrant for any movement it's going to stay alive. generally speaking given the ups and nasa politics is as good a shape as it is there have. i'm the chairman of the intercollegiate studies institute. others of you have participated there. an organization is events constantly doing a number of amazing things on college campuses across the country. has the largest list of professors associated with any organization sab association, somewhere in the 15,000 to 20,000 range. all sorts of things going on and will continue to go on. to summarize coming back to whittaker chambers, it's safe to say we chambers did as was mentioned earlier in the conference
? >> with respect to what he ultimately called a huge foreign policy blunder? >> he -- that's his characterization and if people want to challenge his characterization, they will have that opportunity. >> in your judgment, was he wrong on iraq? >> i would not have called it that h i would have said i think the president had more than sufficient basis to believe there were weapons of mass destruction that were a danger to the world and possibility of those weapons going to terrorists. and so, he undertook military action. i think that was the correct thing to do and it was well supported by the intelligence. i think we did not execute the operation well. once baghdad fell. >> there w-- once baghdad fell, was a feeling that was the end of it. it was not. it was just the beginning for it. >> he was controversial for comments he made gays, add said about a ambassadorial nominee during the clinton administration, he was aggressively gay and detract from his effectiveness. he apologized for those comments. >> the apology accepted by the ambassador. >> but he -- the question that has been raised is can h
detachment has been his foreign policy hallmark. "economy" writes that a tone of cool detachment has been his forei foreign-policy hallmark. from being the "indispensable nation, "mr. preside nation, "so how do you see the nex they are a catalyst present but t four years? not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that factor into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if y
this at all, richard, to discredit the president on foreign policy? >> i have to say that i think that benghazi is largely a function of people who suffer from obama-derangement syndrome, because i think that people who are kind of looking at the facts, does this trace to the white house, and does it trace to the president or the secretary of the state, and i h think that every bit of information that we have so far the answer to all of the questions so far is no. might they keep hammering it? of course, but at the end of the day, i don't believe we will look back in the second term and said, man, they should have gotten that benghazi behind them, because they have. >> and do you think that we will be talking about benghazi coming up? >> we, the facts and the more that the white house and the administration says this happened and by the way, that happened and not just from the partisan perspective, but coming from the state department and so forth, and with all respect, it is the senate role to ask the tough questions and the question is whether or not it is a legitimate con ver
our foreign policy and immigration. >> the first of the democratic convention in charlotte, a bus pulled up in front of the gates. the undocubus. scores of people got out chanting, "no papers, no fear." 10 people got arrested in the pouring rain as police poured in immigration is one of the key issues of the election year, yet you don't have presidential candidates to have a vastly different approach to it. >> it is true that i think it is the increasingly become an issue, and the heartland of america, especially in the south. for instance in north carolina, there's been a huge increase in the latino population of north carolina, but most people don't understand how those latinos got there. it is a largely guatemalan migration, and its large the people who were recruited in the 1980's and 1990's to come and work in the textile mills of north carolina, because part of what i try to show in the book is the enormous connection between the needs of capital of american expanding industries in the u.s. and this recruitment of labor. what happened basically is in the 1980's, more salvado
doubts about his foreign policy and. it was natural for him to pick then-senator clinton to be secretary of state. i think in a second term, he is not running for reelection. he is more inclined to pick somebody he is comfortable with. the gun along in the senate, so presumably they will get along in it administrations -- they got along in the senate, so presumably they will get along in the administration. i think the fundamental reason, senator hagel, he and the president are in lock step. one of the things it should be done in the hearings for the nomination, and the things about american power and leadership, it is fine to talk about the limits of power. everyone should understand hard limits to power. i think that issue, that debate can be used fully put on the table when senator hagel is before committees. host: whopper we dig the life and careewe dig into the lr of senator chuck hagel. i want to point out a "that is beginning a lot of attention. -- quote that has been gettin ga lot og a lot of attention. "the jewish lobby intimidates a lot of people up here," referring to capitol
the obama administration's foreign policy. he is handing off the cut backs to a former member of the military. i do not expect him to be part of the foreign policy. it will be closely held as it was in the first administration. he is a big defense cutter. maybe that is ironic he is a dedicated vietnam vet. it is going to slash the defense department more. >> the question is whether you are going to trim the budget with an axe of scalpel. chuck haeg eext lel can't get i. it takes decades. >> he was opposed to it. >> that may be one reason why he stepped down. i'm told that there is no sorrow. this is frying pan an fire. i know that chuck haegel a month into this process is likely to be the secretary of defense and the defense department is adjusting accordingly. what did all of this say of chuck schumer. he is such a prominent sjewish leader? how can he flip-flop like this? >> the senators are to judge chuck haegel on his record. it throws the whole process. it does. and i wonder whether it doesn't do more harm than good at the end of the day. results matter. mr. haegle has a v
of presidents in their second terms have focused heavily on foreign policy. and now that mr. obama has begun the job of replacing his outgoing secretaries of state and defense and the director of the cia, he'll have some new faces to work with on his foreign policy team. joe johns, cnn, washington. >> and next hour, we take a closer look at the issues that will likely define president obama's second term. >>> randi, what's coming up next? >> we have a whole lot still ahead, victor. she set fashion trends four years ago when president obama was sworn into office, so what will michelle obama wear to this weekend's inaugural events? we'll have a look at the first lady's fashion, coming up. >>> i think that there's no more higher purpose right now than to take care of folks, put themselves in harm's way, protect our freedoms. >> more than half a million folks have done more than one tour. that's a tremendous emotional and physical burden we've put on our folks that's totally unprecedented. >> we're acknowledging that people are always going to have some effect. we just want them to be able to be
, looking at the president's second term, this focusing on foreign policy and and domestic issues. $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreignit was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate that is as old as the republic. washington's generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world's oppressed. bit embeddedit was a place to which victims of liberty. there was no sense that we were values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case youwhy is the president having two swearing-in ceremonies? according to the inaugural committee, it has happened on six previous occasions. one today at the white house, one tomorrow at the capitol. guest: it was at the height of the war. his health was failing. they did away with most of the pomp, and had the ceremony on the grounds of the
and quite a bit of, his reputation for talking about foreign policy. when he was in the senate, he had a light footprint when it came to military services. i am not so sure his experience to hisly oepens up being the right guy to be the secretary of defense. host: we have heard about the concern of sequestration and spending $500 billion over the next decade, $120 billion over the next year. what does that portend as to what secretary chuck hagel would face? guest: the defense department, when you are making decisions about spending and technology, these are decisions that were crafted a year ago. in some cases, a decade ago. to think you can turn on a dime is a very hard. so the defense secretary and with a lot of white house guidance has been planning for this. but it is a bearish big shock to the system. i am one who thinks that you can make a substantial cut. if you've had that level of automatic spending cuts, it would create the equivalent of a depression and a big shock to the pentagon. i think it is not smart security strategy. but chuck hagel would have to get in there. he has
foreign policy. >> okay. >> what about his policy, policy. >> would you agree though that other than his domestic and foreign policies he is not doing a bad job? >> no, i think there is is a narrow middle ground that is not covered by the domestic or the foreign, the inner galactic policies. >> he won't build a death star. >> he is less like ambudsing points. just an outside observer. >> he has done great work with middle earth. >> he is a free marketer. hands-off the middle earth. >> jedediah, i am with you. i thought the ad was bad. they could have made their point without using the first family. as you pointed out, in a subsequent ad they did. >> i just think really -- they would have looked like the bigger people to come back and say you know what, barack obama, you want to use kids to make your point that's fine. play the higher ground. if you have the facts on your side, you don't need to go there. >> personally i think the nra has gone off the rails. i got tired of reading unhinged e-mails from them. >> they felt the same way about you. >> my e-mails to them were not out of hand.
clearly was a historic item. what could be historic beyond foreign policy considerations we do not know that might occur about a second obama administration? >> immigration reform, something on gun violence but also if you put tax reform in there in its sense of not only providing a new simpler tax code, one that has a growth component to it but you can't get the tax reform without having some kind of lengthy, i'm not saying five or six years but at least lengthy cease-fire on debt ceilings and all these itinerant fiscal dramas. if the president were able to move in those directions, get all three of those on the board, because that is about the window he has, second term presidency really begins to expire after two and a half years, maybe sometime sooner, that would be historic. >> rose: do you agree with that, al? >> i do. i'm very skeptical that it ain't going to happen in tax reform. i saw the '85, '86 tax act. almost none of the ingredients that existed then for that very difficult task exists today. i think there was people on both sides who like to see it. i am very dubious. i th
relations president richard haass, author of the forthcoming book "foreign policy begins at home" and martha raddatz. martha, let me begin with you. we saw that announcement from the president on friday speeding up the withdrawal of american troops out of afghanistan. that's a little faster than the military wanted, but he was silent on how many troops would be left behind. what's behind the decision, and where do you expect it will end up? >> well, i think all through the election season, all they ever talk about was leaving afghanistan, but this is real. this was a very big deal this week and a very big change. u.s. troops will be in an advise and train -- that's all they'll be doing come spring. >> pulling back from the front lines. >> pulling back from the front lines. they will be with afghan forces. the president has not announced how fast they'll draw down but i suspect by the end of this year we could be down to 30,000 troops. we're 66,000 troops now, possibly down to 30,000 and when we really draw down in 2014, when we are no longer doing combat missions, i think you'll see anywhere
the latest details and take a look at the latest front in the growing list of u.s. foreign policy challenges when nbc news foreign correspondent amman joins us on set coming up next. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? maybe you want to incorporate a business. or protect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal plan attorney is available in most states with every personalized document to answer questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. >>> the white house is currently monitoring a kidnapping situation. approximately 44 nationals, including an unconfirmed number of americans, were kidnapped wednesday by an al qaeda linked group in retaliation for french air strikes against rebel forces in neighboring mali. speaking from the white house podium this hour white house press secretary jay carney, confirmed that u.s. citizens are involved and said president obama was being briefed regularly on the ongoing situation. he would not address media reports that a rescue attempt by the algerian
foreign policy posts, we can be sure that vietnam will continue to lurk in the foreign policy apparatus. you'd think we couldn't learn more of what happened in vietnam given the books and movies telling the tales but you would be wrong. one day, one graduate student researching post traumatic stress disorder searched through secret pentagon archives and interviewing vets and reading journals to uncover the story of american atrocities in vietnam. in a war where we killed more than 2 million civilians. the result is a book called "kill anything that moves" where he says the stunning scale of civilian suffering far beyond the result of bad apples but the policy. serious accusations of nick turs joining us now. i want to warn the viewers some of the images in this segment might be disturbing. but nick, the most important question, what is the value to america in unearthing this now and talking to americans about the things, the atrocities that happened in vietnam at american hands? >> well, thanks for having me on. i think it's incumbent on americans to know exactly what war is about, espe
agenda now. and in foreign policy, very often, the actions you have taken, the consequences are now clear whether good or bad. and you either have to make a corrective course for some of the bad consequences or try to solidify some of the gains that you've made. and because you really don't have four years now. it will start to slip away very quickly. you've got to set some priorities, because the president's time, the secretary of state's time, secretary of defense's time is pretty limited. you better know what you want to achieve in in in three years or so >> you told me earlier this morning something i had never known. upper the national security adviser, one of the president's closest aides during the first term. then you were nominated to be secretary of state, and you told me you had to go through a full background check. >> that's right. i remember thinking-- they were going out and talking to my neighbors again. and i remember thinking didn't we just do this four years ago? you know what i've been doing for the last four years. maybe it's a little bit of a sense of the turf wars i
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